Elles sont tombées

Ruth HartleyEducation, Feminism, m’Other Art4 Comments

The fall of Kabul to the Taliban has filled me with despair for the future and hopes of women there and for women everywhere. I felt driven to once again show the paintings I made about the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Centre together with my installation about women. It is on show in the Foyer Rural in Labatut-Riviere […]

Cancelling people, erasing history, burning libraries, & killing souls

Ruth Hartley Storytelling, Colonialism, Family, Feminism, Human rights, Installations, Racism, Slavery2 Comments

Burying a living soul and the death I was responsible for When Mike walked back into my flat that day back in 1968, he was dead. His face was rigid. His eyes stared blindly. “My father buried me.” Mike spoke as if every word was a stone placed on his own grave. “Dad held a funeral service in the synagogue […]

When I Was Bad

Ruth HartleyApartheid, Family, Feminism, Human rights, Religion, South Africa, When I Was BadLeave a Comment

Wicked women Bridget and I are the same age and we were both ‘unmarried mothers’ a long time ago. Bridget became pregnant in Ireland at 17 years. She escaped to London but was sent home by a priest to the torture of the brutal Bessborough home, a Catholic institution for unmarried mothers. Her tragic story and the death of her […]

Mary Wollstonecraft, nude statues & feminism

Ruth HartleyEducation, Feminism, Slavery, Visual Arts8 Comments

Mary Wollstonecraft naked A statue to honour Mary Wollstonecraft, created by Maggi Hambling and commissioned by Mary on the Green, has been erected at Newington Green. It depicts a small, stern-faced, naked female figure with a bush of hair on her pubic mound rising out of swirling silver shapes and it has caused a great deal of outrage and criticism […]

Zambian Art 1964 -1994 – a lost history

Ruth HartleyArt history, Feminism, Mpapa Gallery, Visual Arts, Zambia3 Comments

Mpapa Gallery, Women and Art in Zambia In 1984 when I started working at Mpapa Gallery with Joan Pilcher, Cynthia Zukas and Patrick Mweemba, there were many women making art, but few were Zambian and none were black. Most women artists were the expatriate wives of businessmen, diplomats and aid agency officials. Colonial domination of Zambian culture before 1964 is […]